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Common Ground/Rogerian Argument


Joni Dougherty  	The introduction of Common Core State Standards was designed to help K-12 students master key language arts and mathematics skills through narrative nonfiction compared to fiction that has primarily focused on self-expression. Supporters of the Common Core State Standards argue that the use of fiction in languages arts has limited students’ skills in language arts and mathematics for students in grades-k12 because the fiction focuses on improving self-expression (Bezbradica et al. 83). Overly focus on self-expression limits students’ authenticity and competitiveness in the labor market, given that self-expression does not influence one’s competitiveness in the labor market (Hodge et al. 75). To avoid overreliance on self-expression created through fiction, which focuses on hypothetical characters, a common core standard has been introduced to improve students’ language arts and mathematics skills in K-12 through narrative nonfiction (Chlebuch et al. 168).
Common Ground/Rogerian Argument

Common Ground/Rogerian Argument


The introduction of Common Core State Standards was designed to help K-12 students master key language arts and mathematics skills through narrative nonfiction compared to fiction that has primarily focused on self-expression. Supporters of the Common Core State Standards argue that the use of fiction in languages arts has limited students’ skills in language arts and mathematics for students in grades-k12 because the fiction focuses on improving self-expression (Bezbradica et al. 83). Overly focus on self-expression limits students’ authenticity and competitiveness in the labor market, given that self-expression does not influence one’s competitiveness in the labor market (Hodge et al. 75). To avoid overreliance on self-expression created through fiction, which focuses on hypothetical characters, a common core standard has been introduced to improve students’ language arts and mathematics skills in K-12 through narrative nonfiction (Chlebuch et al. 168).


Scholars have supported narrative notification to improve k-12 students' literacy skills in languages arts and mathematics over fiction, given the limited focus on reality. Narrative fiction is based on real-life stories about real people or events containing stylistic basics akin to those depicted more in fiction (Bezbradica et al. 85). However, unlike fiction, narrative nonfiction entails in-depth research compared to convectional new reportage given its creative flexibility (Chlebuch et al. 167). To be a narrative writer, he or she must make deliberate efforts to conduct an in-depth investigation on the topic or areas of interest to accurately present the facts or details in present facts or details in a literary way. In turn, this could play an important role in improving k-12 students’ skills in language arts and mathematics compared to fiction where the focus is placed on self-expression that could limit their creativity or acquisition of relevant skills required in the labor market or practical life (Hodge et al. 79).


Narrative nonfiction is preferred for teaching k-12 students because they are true stories, making the readers factually informed instead of focusing on self-expression depicted from hypothetical characters in fiction. According to researchers, narrative fiction is likely to play an important role in improving K-12 students’ mathematics, and language arts skills through creative and real-life stories told through fiction (Bezbradica et al. 87). The point is supported by researchers who argued that narrative nonfiction improves learners’ creativity and analytical skills (Chlebuch et al. 169). After conducting an in-depth study, the stories told through fiction are factual, which enhances students' analytical and creative skills. Although narrative nonfiction focuses on storytelling itself, deliberate efforts are made to ensure that it remains as accurate as possible, depicting the actual truth, facts, or real-life events after a detailed analysis of the phenomenon (Hodge et al. 78). This way, students will be empowered with analytical skills through an interactive research process in mathematics and language arts.


Narrative nonfiction is preferred for improving k-12 students’ mathematics and language arts skills because they contain facts, which represent a set of information that can be proved to be true. For instance, researchers argued using different types of narrative nonfiction, such as historical nonfiction comprises true and accurate accounts of historical periods and events (Chlebuch et al. 170). Such knowledge may improve students’ skills in language arts because some histories focus purely on objective facts, and other histories may be refracted through the author’s personal beliefs and lens (Lee 90). Researchers have also identified Biographies, autobiographies, memoirs, travel guides and travelogues, Academic texts, and journalism as comparing factual and accurate representations of thoughts that may help students relate directly to real-world scenarios (Chlebuch et al. 171).


Despite the support provided toward the use of narrative fiction to improve students' skills in language arts and mathematics, scholars have opposing views on whether its use could mean the end of fiction in education. For instance, some scholars’ questions position relating to the use of narrative nonfiction to teach students in K-12 as a strategic move to remove fiction from education (Lee 93). Other scholars have also defended the use of fiction in education as being similar to journalism as it helps students to improve their self-expression and creativity through hypothetical charterers (Chlebuch et al. 173). Students may still be creative when taught through fiction, given that they are compelled to think and act hypothetically (Lee 98). Fiction plays an important role in improving students’ creativity, and policies should be implanted to enhance its forms and not substitute them with narrative nonfiction (Hodge et al. 77).


Despite missed findings regarding the decisions to use narrative nonfiction over fiction, I strongly believe that there is considerable evidence supporting the use of narrative nonfiction to improve students’ skills in mathematics and language arts. For instance, narrative fiction is better than fiction in education, given that narrative fiction focuses on in-depth reporting of a real work situation or stories (Lee 96). The implication is that such reportage is factual and provable. In-depth analysis of factual stories and real-life events improves students’ research and analytical skills, thus important in teaching k-12 students compared to fiction that only focuses on self-expression with limited application to real-world situations.


Works Cited

Bezbradica, Viktorija. "Eudora Welty's Cyclical Temporality: Intersections among Memoir, Nonfiction, and Fiction." Eudora Welty Review, vol. 11, no.1 (2019): 83-90. http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/ewr.2019.0011

Chlebuch, Natasha, Thalia R. Goldstein, and Deena Skolnick Weisberg. "Fact or fiction?: Clarifying the relationship between reading and the improvement of social skills." Scientific Study of Literature, vol. 10, no.2 (2020): 167-192. https://doi.org/10.1075/ssol.20007.chl

Hodge, Emily M., Rachael Gabriel, and Susan Chenelle. "Beyond fact-checking: An examination of research use in the appendix to the Common Core State Standards." the elementary school journal, vol, 121, no.1 (2020): 75-99. https://doi.org/10.1086/709982

Lee, Okhee. "Common core state standards for ELA/literacy and next generation science standards: Convergences and discrepancies using argument as an example." Educational Researcher, vol 46, no. 2 (2017): 90-102. https://doi.org/10.3102%2F0013189X17699172



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